Top 10 Posts for Zinger of a Year 2020 on Philanthropy Women

What a stressful, challenging, and world-view altering year. Between COVID, the free-fall of the economy, and the ongoing lack of clarity from the election, it feels like there’s no end to the new harm and instability in the world, particularly for women and girls. Here’s a look at what went wrong, and right, for gender equality funding strategies this past year, as represented by our Top 10 posts here at Philanthropy Women.

Photo by lucia on Unsplash

Listed below are the top 10 posts on Philanthropy Women for 2020, factoring in page views and social media shares, as well as stats on high-authority backlinks for each post. These are the posts that produced the most reverberations across the culture, from what we could tell.

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One of 12 trends identified in this sector analysis post: State-based women’s funds such are getting more powerful as large foundations like the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation begin to recognize the value of their existing infrastructure to leverage social change. (Image credit: Women’s Foundation California)

#2 The Highest and Best Use of My Worth: S. Mona Sinha

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S. Mona Sinha’s essay on discovering the highest and best use of her worth garnered our third highest views for the year, and also received over 800 shares on Facebook. Some of this extra attention may have come from Smith College (alma mater for S. Mona Sinha and myself) sharing the post. (Image credit: S. Mona Sinha)

#3 As NoVo Downsizes, What Next for Women and Girls?

The NoVo Foundation, known for its groundbreaking strategy for girls of color, announced plans to downsize in 2020.

#4 COVID-19 Special Edition: Women’s Leadership Matters

The Equality Fund is a breakthrough new multi-national effort at gender-based strategy in philanthropy. One of its founders, Jessica Houssian, shared her expertise, along with 11 other women’s giving experts, in our COVID-19 Special Edition: Women’s Leadership Matters. (Image Credit: Equality Fund)

#5 Ms. Foundation: Donors Must Step Up for Women and Girls of Color

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“Pocket Change–How Women and Girls of Color Do More With Less” examines the funding crisis for organizations that serve, are led by, or are founded by women and girls of color. (Image Credit: Ms. Foundation/Strength in Numbers Consulting Group)

#6 Kamala Harris: “We’re Gonna Get it Done.”

Vice Presidential candidate Kamala Harris spoke with Errin Haines of The 19th on Friday, August 14th, giving details of her experience becoming the first woman of color nominated to the U.S. Presidential ticket. (Image Credit: The 19th video, Youtube)

#7 CONVICTED! Weinstein Trial Shows Success of Funding #MeToo

Harvey Weinstein heads into court. (Photo Credit: AP, Michael Owens)

#8 Anybody Got a Spare $6.3 Billion to Fund Women and Girls?

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Photo by Monica Melton on Unsplash

#9 10 Donations to Easily Optimize Giving Tuesday for Women and Girls

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Did you know that research from the Women’s Philanthropy Institute showed that in 2018, women gave the majority, 64.9%, of dollars donated on Giving Tuesday? Perhaps that’s because women generally look for opportunities to give, and when a new holiday is established where the sole purpose is to give to charity, women are all over it.

#10 MacKenzie Scott and the $14.2 Billion Dollar Question for Women & Girls

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Photo of Stockholm, Sweden by Lindsey LaMont on Unsplash

Shortlisted Posts Worth Noting

Other contenders for the Top 10 Spots in terms of page views, social media shares and high authority backlinks include:

What if Only Women Voted in the 2020 Election?

New Hub Launches for Women of Color in Giving

What Melinda Gates Says, and Doesn’t Say, About Women in COVID

Lessons for Philanthropy from Black Women Leaders

New Climate and Gender Justice Funder Announces Grantees

Women’s Collective Giving: Expanding Power

NoVo Accounted for 17% of US Funding for Women’s Rights

Kiersten Marek

Author: Kiersten Marek

Kiersten Marek, LICSW, is the founder of Philanthropy Women. She practices clinical social work in Cranston, Rhode Island, and writes about how women donors and their allies are advancing social change.

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