Ms. Foundation to Philanthropy: Grow Local Economies by Supporting Low Wage Workers and Childcare Access

Childcare Impact Assessment, a new report from Ms. Foundation for Women, links up ways to effectively support women in the workforce: better wages and childcare access.

We know that childcare needs to be valued and supported for society to thrive. Yet, time and again, we leave parents, particularly low-income and young parents, out of the picture for access to childcare.

Today, a new study released by the Ms. Foundation for Women validated that state and local officials need to take the reigns and steer their community toward economic growth by funding access to childcare.

“Our approach has not only helped the local organizations achieve policy gains, but also provided necessary resources to develop intersectional leadership in grassroots organizations,” said Aleyamma Mathew, Director of Economic Justice at the Ms. Foundation for Women. “To achieve economic security in the Trump era, we have to win on the state and local level,” she added.

Mathew emphasized that progress can continue if policymakers adequately fund childcare access for our nation’s most marginalized women. “Progress is possible if we continue to break down silos and work together.”

The Ms. Foundation strategy to address child care access calls on funders to do three things:

  1. Support low-wage workers’ rights organizations and workers’ centers who organize in sectors that are made up of up 50% women.
  2. Support new and innovative campaigns that increase public sector funding for childcare at the local and state level.
  3. Work to raise wages and the quality of jobs in the childcare sector.

Download the full report here.

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Author: Kiersten Marek

Kiersten Marek, LICSW, is the founder of Philanthropy Women. She practices clinical social work in Cranston, Rhode Island, and writes about how women donors and their allies are advancing social change.

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