New Study Funded by Global Coalition Sheds Light on Violence Against Women in the Middle East

The new study, called IMAGES MENA for short, is funded by governments, the UN, and the Arcus and Oak Foundations.

A coalition of international and UN organizations, private foundations and governments have come together to produce startling new research on the state of gender norms in the Middle East. The study, entitled Understanding Masculinities: Results from the International Men and Gender Equality Survey (IMAGES) for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), helps to clarify how cultural norms for both men and women contribute to hostility and violence against women, specifically in the nations of Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, and Palestine.

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What’s up with this New Philanthropy Hub, and How Will It Involve Women’s Philanthropy?

Giving Compass aggregates philanthropy news and information by topics, including news and information about women’s philanthropy.

Recently, I got an email from Stephanie Gillis, Senior Advisor at the Raikes Foundation, wanting to “explore potential synergies” with the work we are doing at Philanthropy Women. Naturally, I was eager to do so, and soon learned about Givingcompass.org, a new team effort of several foundations and nonprofits, aimed at drawing on the chops of the tech sector in order to provide more resources for the philanthropy sector, particularly around how to assess the quality of philanthropy and get the most impact per philanthropy dollar.

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The Grateful Activist: This Longtime Philanthropy Leader Shares Insights

Tracy Gary has played a key role in building the infrastructure of women’s philanthropy over the past 40 years.

Tracy Gary says she starts every day as a “grateful activist.” That’s a good way to approach the morning, and an attitude that infuses the 66-year old Gary’s now 40-year career as philanthropy advisor, non-profit leader, donor and consultant.

A founder of nearly two dozen non-profits, Gary heads Unleashing Generosity and Inspired Legacies, and is on the road 40 days per year working with non-profits, foundations, and donors. That’s down from the 200 days away from home she used to log, but in the last few years she has reduced her workload (which used to run to 60-80 hours per week) and dropped 100 pounds. It’s a matter of staying healthy, and staying on the planet, so that she can continue mentoring the next generation of inheritors and philanthropy professionals.

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Givers, or Takers? Callahan’s New Book Takes a Hard Look at Philanthropy’s Alpha Donors

David Callahan, Founder and Editor of Inside Philanthropy and author of The Givers

Great private wealth is nothing new, but reading David Callahan’s The Givers will convince you that there is a different game at play today, with staggering fortunes and unprecedented elite hubris. Some fortunes are so big, and growing so fast, that even a dedicated philanthropist can’t give the money away fast enough. To cite just one example, Michael Bloomberg was worth around $5 billion when he became mayor of New York in 2002; he’s now worth more than $45 billion. With this figure in mind, the over one billion dollars he has given Johns Hopkins University to date doesn’t seem so big. Still, it’s an astonishing sum for most of us to contemplate. And that’s not all. Bloomberg has also given hundreds of millions to reduce smoking and traffic deaths globally, and combat climate change.

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Ana Morales: Building on her Family Legacy with Philanthropy in Mexico

Ana Morales, Philanthropist and Founding Member of Maverick Collective

When you meet Ana Morales you are immediately struck by her charm. She is warm, funny, approachable, accessible.

But if you stop there, you’d be missing out on the full picture. Morales is also a philanthropist who is constantly working to understand the world and give back.  And given how fearlessly she approaches this mission, she is a great study in how women are changing the face of global philanthropy.

Born and raised in Monterrey, Mexico, Morales credits her interest in community and social change to her grandfather, Roberto, a man who epitomized giving back.

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Helen LaKelly Hunt: Feminism and Philanthropy Are Converging to Create a New Relationship Culture

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Helen LaKelly Hunt

If you spend time reading about women and philanthropy, you will invariably come across Helen LaKelly Hunt. Along with her sister, Swanee Hunt, these two feminist philanthropists are major players in the women’s funding movement, which hit the big leagues in the past decade as high-net-worth women began to make gifts of over $1 million dollars to fund causes for women and girls.  

While researching for her dissertation on the origins of American feminism, Hunt discovered that 19th century women didn’t fund the suffrage movement. Instead, they funded things like their husband’s alma maters, churches (where they had no voice) and the arts. Years later, when women began pledging and making million-dollar gifts to women’s funds, Hunt captured that history in a book called the Trailblazer book, which was circulated to other women donors. This compilation of women’s testimonies helped catalyze the founding of Women Moving Millions.  

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The Hidden Children: How Lumos is Empowering Social Change for Orphans Worldwide

Ten years into her signature philanthropic endeavor, Lumos, author J.K. Rowling has grown increasingly vocal about her disdain for developing world orphanages that do nothing to address the underlying needs of children and families.

Readers here at The Chronicle of Social Change know about the damage that child welfare systems can do to children, but perhaps even more damaging are money-driven orphanage systems, where children can suffer extreme neglect and lifetime attachment issues. And parents, often because of poverty, are deprived of the opportunity to raise their children.

“Globally, poverty is the no. 1 reason that children are institutionalized. Well-intentioned Westerners supporting orphanages perpetuate this highly damaging system and encourage the creation of more institutions as money magnets,” tweeted Rowling in late August, when expressing her fury at a voluntourism charity that was offering young adults the “CV-distinguishing” opportunity to volunteer in an orphanage in Moldova, where they could “play and interact” with children ”in desperate need of affection.”

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Why Give for Women and Girls?

Do you ever wonder what motivates someone to give money? Obviously, the answer is “yes” if you’re a professional fundraiser. But those who give may also wonder what’s really causing them to reach for that checkbook.

Research from the Women’s Philanthropy Institute sheds light on this area, particularly as it pertains to women at every level of society. Now, WPI has released a study showing for the first time that women are motivated by personal experience to give to causes that benefit women and girls specifically.

Sounds like a no-brainer, right? Well, it’s actually significant, useful information. Women’s tendency to donate money to specific causes based on experiences like having a child or discrimination suggests that philanthropy might take off in new directions as women become primary asset-holders in society and further increase their giving.

With the growth of women’s giving, so grows the visibility of this giving, and so grows the research. The new report, “Giving to Women and Girls: Who Gives, and Why,” explores the methods and motivations of donors who give to women’s and girls’ issues. The report is one of three produced by the Women’s Philanthropy Institute with a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which has recently swung new resources behind WPI, as we’ve reported.

“Understanding the demographics and motivations of those who are giving to women’s and girls’ causes is increasingly important if we are to improve the lives of women and girls, and their families and communities,” said Debra Mesch, Ph.D., director of the Women’s Philanthropy Institute, upon release of the report.

This research involved a brief nationally representative survey panel, and used seven focus groups drawn from “United Way and women’s fund donors who actively funded women’s and girls’ causes as well as donors who focused on other areas in their giving.” The study found that women are likely to give more, and give larger amounts, to causes that benefit women and girls. In particular, women are more likely to fund “domestic violence organizations, women’s centers, LGBT rights, cancer care and research, and economic opportunities for women and girls.”

Again, this may hardly seem like news, especially if you follow the news on women’s philanthropy. But hard data that nails these trends down has been pretty scarce.

Meanwhile, the report also confirms that women’s funds are a strong and diverse new way that people are giving more intentionally, and with gender equity impacts in mind. But the report identifies some significant gaps in data—such as aggregated financial information from women’s funds, both past and present, that could help determine which women’s funds are increasing their resources over time, and what fundraising approaches help facilitate growth of these funds. This is important data, and it is surprising that we are only now at the point of addressing this information gap, given that women’s funds have been growing across the country for decades.

It is unknown if the growth of women’s funds is a broad, pervasive trend, or if the distribution of growth is unequal, with some funds skyrocketing while others barely limp along. As you might expect, not all women’s funds thrive to the same degree. I know of at least one women’s fund in which the endowment never fully recovered from the 2008 economic meltdown, and there are probably more out there like that. At the same time, other women’s funds have been booming, such as the Dallas Women’s Foundation, which is now at $33 million in assets. What’s to explain the divergent fortunes of different women’s funds?

This research also questions the value proposition of women’s funds as opposed to other philanthropic vehicles, and suggests that further research is needed to determine which models for women’s funds are sustainable over time. Would women’s funds be better off positioned as leadership development and/or incubator organizations for women’s entrepreneurship, rather than long-term regranting organizations for nonprofits?

The report also addresses the role of men in giving to girls’ causes. Contrary to what you might expect, men comprised 40 percent of the respondents who donated to causes for women and girls. More research in this area is also needed. For example, how does including men on governing boards of women’s funds impact giving? Does more diverse and inclusive leadership of women’s funds expand donor populations for women’s funds?

Another important finding: the language of women’s and girls funds is changing, becoming more sophisticated, and targeting broader issues like poverty, community development, and social policy change. Early on, women’s funds used the language of “funding for women and girls,” while today, women’s funds are “advancing leadership” and addressing “economic security,” language designed to elevate the conversation and create larger-scale systemic change.

Women’s philanthropy has been rising. But beyond that, there are many unanswered questions in this area. Nobody is doing more than WPI to shed light on these questions, and it’s good to know that the Gates Foundation has put some serious money behind this effort lately.

ever wonder what motivates someone to give money? Obviously, the answer is “yes” if you’re a professional fundraiser. But those who give may also wonder what’s really causing them to reach for that checkbook.

Research from the Women’s Philanthropy Institute sheds light on this area, particularly as it pertains to women at every level of society. Now, WPI has released a study showing for the first time that women are motivated by personal experience to give to causes that benefit women and girls specifically.

Sounds like a no-brainer, right? Well, it’s actually significant, useful information. Women’s tendency to donate money to specific causes based on experiences like having a child or discrimination suggests that philanthropy might take off in new directions as women become primary asset-holders in society and further increase their giving.

Source: Experience Matters: Who Gives for Women and Girls, and Why – Inside PhilanthropyRead More